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Required Reading

Wiki Management: A Revolutionary New Model for a Rapidly Changing and Collaborative World By Rod Collins

We now live in a "wiki" world where mass collaboration is not only possible - it's often the best solution. Conventional management thought assumes that command - and - control is the most effective way to organize the efforts of large numbers of people, but rapid change and increasing complexity have rendered that model obsolete. As a result, most managers today lack the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in an age when networks are proving smarter and faster than hierarchies.

Designing organizations for mass collaboration demands a new and very different model-wiki management. The book features enlightening examples from forward-thinking companies including Google, Whole Foods, Linux, and Wikipedia.
[More About This Book]   Nov-10-2013

 

Innovating Analytics By Larry Freed

Innovating Analytics introduces an index that measures a customer’s likelihood to recommend and the likelihood to detract. The current concept of the Net Promoter Score (NPS) that has been adopted by many companies during the last decade—is no longer accurate, precise or actionable. This new metric called the Word of Mouth Index (WoMI) has been tested on hundreds of companies and with over 1.5 million consumers over the last two years.

Author Larry Freed details the improvement that WoMI provides within what he calls the Measurement Ecosystem. He then goes on to look at three other drivers of customer satisfaction along with word of mouth: customer acquisition, customer loyalty, and customer conversion.
[More About This Book]   Nov-03-2013

 

The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon By Brad Stone

Amazon.com started off delivering books through the mail. But its visionary founder, Jeff Bezos, wasn't content with being a bookseller. He wanted Amazon to become the everything store, offering limitless selection and seductive convenience at disruptively low prices. To do so, he developed a corporate culture of relentless ambition and secrecy that's never been cracked. Until now.

Brad Stone enjoyed unprecedented access to current and former Amazon employees and Bezos family members, giving readers the first in-depth, fly-on-the-wall account of life at Amazon. Compared to tech's other elite innovators--Jobs, Gates, Zuckerberg--Bezos is a private man. But he stands out for his restless pursuit of new markets, leading Amazon into risky new ventures like the Kindle and cloud computing, and transforming retail in the same way Henry Ford revolutionized manufacturing.
[More About This Book]   Oct-27-2013

 

How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big: Kind of the Story of My Life by Scott Adams

Scott Adams has likely failed at more things than anyone you’ve ever met or anyone you’ve even heard of. So how did he go from hapless office worker and serial failure to the creator of Dilbert, one of the world’s most famous syndicated comic strips, in just a few years?

Adams reveals that he's failed at just about everything he's tried, including his corporate career, his inventions, his investments, and his two restaurants. But there's a lot to learn from his personal story, and a lot of humor along the way. Adams discovered some unlikely truths that helped to propel him forward. For instance:

  • Goals are for losers. Systems are for winners.

  • "Passion" is bull. What you need is personal energy.

  • A combination of mediocre skills can make you surprisingly valuable.

  • You can manage your odds in a way that makes you look lucky to others.


  • Adams hopes you can laugh at his failures while discovering some unique and helpful ideas on your own path to personal victory.
    [More About This Book]   Oct-20-2013

     

    The Human Brand: How We Relate to People, Products, and Companies By Chris Malone, Susan T. Fiske

    People everywhere describe their relationships with brands in a deeply personal way—we hate our banks, love our smartphones, and think the cable company is out to get us. What's actually going on in our brains when we make these judgments? Through original research, customer loyalty expert Chris Malone and top social psychologist Susan Fiske discovered that our perceptions arise from spontaneous judgments on warmth and competence, the same two factors that also determine our impressions of people.

    We see companies and brands the same way we automatically perceive, judge, and behave toward one another. As a result, to achieve sustained success, companies must forge genuine relationships with customers. And as customers, we have a right to expect relational accountability from the companies and brands we support.
    [More About This Book]   Oct-13-2013

     

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