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Required Reading

Inside Apple: How America's Most Admired--and Secretive--Company Really Works by Adam Lashinsky

INSIDE APPLE reveals the secret systems, tactics and leadership strategies that allowed Steve Jobs and his company to churn out hit after hit and inspire a cult-like following for its products.

Based on numerous interviews, the book offers exclusive new information about how Apple innovates, deals with its suppliers and is handling the transition into the Post Jobs Era. Lashinsky, a Senior Editor at Large for Fortune, knows the subject cold: In a 2008 cover story for the magazine entitled The Genius Behind Steve: Could Operations Whiz Tim Cook Run The Company Someday he predicted that Tim Cook, then an unknown, would eventually succeed Steve Jobs as CEO.
[More About This Book]   Feb-05-2012

 

Uncommon Service: How to Win by Putting Customers at the Core of Your Business by Frances Frei and Anne Morriss

Most companies treat service as a low-priority business operation, keeping it out of the spotlight until a customer complains. Then service gets to make a brief appearance -- for as long as it takes to calm the customer down and fix whatever foul-up jeopardized the relationship.

In Uncommon Service, Frances Frei and Anne Morriss show how, in a volatile economy where the old rules of strategic advantage no longer hold true, service must become a competitive weapon, not a damage-control function. That means weaving service tightly into every core decision your company makes.
[More About This Book]   Jan-29-2012

 

Taking People With You: The Only Way to Make Big Things Happen by David Novak

David Novak learned long ago that you can't lead a great organization of any size without getting your people aligned, enthusiastic, and focused relentlessly on the mission. But how do you do that?

With over fifteen years spent at Yum! Brands, Novak knows that managers don't need leadership platitudes or business school theories. So he cuts right to the chase with a step-by- step guide to setting big goals, getting people to work together, blowing past your targets, and celebrating after you shock the skeptics. And then doing it again and again until consistent excellence becomes a core element of your culture.
[More About This Book]   Jan-22-2012

 

The Transformational CIO: Leadership and Innovation Strategies for IT Executives in a Rapidly Changing World by Hunter Muller

Unlike the CIOs of the recent decade, the modern CIO must take an active hand in developing and guiding the multiple processes required to achieve the company's strategic goals. This represents a sharp break with the past, when the primary responsibility of IT was serving internal customers and responding to the expressed needs of business units operating within the traditional boundaries of the enterprise.

The Transformational CIO serves as a helpful guide for CIOs, IT leaders, and IT suppliers, covering many of the critical topics that concern IT executives struggling to manage successfully in today's rapidly changing markets. It introduces Muller's four-step modelódefine, build, lead, and changeórevealing a simple, practical framework for developing transformational projects, rolling them out smoothly, and making them operational within the accelerated time frames that have become the norm in business today.
[More About This Book]   Jan-15-2012

 

Best Practices Are Stupid: 40 Ways to Out-Innovate the Competition by Stephen M. Shapiro

What if almost everything you know about creating a culture of innovation is wrong? What if the way you are measuring innovation is choking it? What if your market research is asking all of the wrong questions? It's time to innovate the way you innovate.

Author Stephen Shapiro teaches his clients that innovation isn't just about generating occasional new ideas; it's about staying consistently one step ahead of the competition.

  • Hire people you don't like. Bring in the right mix of people to unleash your team's full potential.

  • Asking for ideas is a bad idea. Define challenges more clearly. If you ask better questions, you will get better answers.

  • Don't think outside the box; find a better box. Instead of giving your employees a blank slate, provide them with well-defined parameters that will increase their creative output.

  • Failure is always an option. Looking at innovation as a series of experiments allows you to redefine failure and learn from your results.

  • [More About This Book]   Jan-08-2012

     

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