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CIO Survey Reveals IT Leaders Struggle to Meet Big Demand for Enterprise App Testing, Development and Rollouts Next Year

Delphix, a provider of agile data management, announced the results of a survey of corporate IT leaders fielded by IDG Research for Delphix to garner insights about plans, IT budgets and business goals for enterprise application development initiatives during the next twelve months. The survey polled 108 top-level IT executives at large global enterprises between August 30 and September 28, 2012. It exposes a growing problem for IT organizations struggling to keep pace with demand for an increasing number of enterprise application projects during the next 12 months.

The vast majority of IT leaders (86 percent) view enterprise app projects as a critical or strategic priority. On average, $173 million per enterprise has been allocated specifically for application projects in 2013, which equates to 41 percent of the average $432 million IT budget of the organizations surveyed. Yet, two thirds of respondents indicate that it's extremely or very challenging to deliver these applications on time or on budget. In fact, for the enterprise apps currently in development, an average of 28 projects are delayed and/or over budget.

  • Enterprise App Development Project Challenges


  • With about 41 percent of their IT budget to spend on enterprise app development projects related to business operations and analysis and an average of 46 new enterprise apps to deploy, 94 percent of IT executives survey admitted their organization finds it challenging to deliver these projects on time and on budget. About 76 percent of IT executives note that this high difficulty of staying on time and on budget has remained largely the same or gotten worse; only 24 percent indicate that it's become easier.

    Often the difficulty lies in the earlier stages of deployment. Roughly one-half (48 percent) indicated their toughest stage is development, while another 38 percent said their toughest stage is testing. Nearly half of IT executives believe this is because of the length of time required to test apps, the resistance they encounter from end users, and the limited skill-sets of their IT employees. Pile these on top of budget constraints and the result is 65 percent of IT executives who find deploying enterprise applications to be extremely or very challenging.

  • Survey Respondent Profile


  • 100 percent are the primary decision maker or a key influencer/contributor in setting strategies and budgets related to enterprise application initiatives.


  • Average overall IT budget for 2013 (including business spending): $423 million.


  • The average company size of respondent organizations is 27,659 employees.


  • Within the organization, 52 percent hold a CIO/CTO title, 38 percent have titles of Executive VP, SVP, VP or General Manager, and 10 percent have a CSO or CISO title.


  • Top industries represented: 22 percent banking/financial services/insurance; 14 percent healthcare; nine percent technology; eight percent public sector/nonprofit (including government and education); seven percent information, media and entertainment; seven percent manufacturing/auto/industrial.

  • [Full Article]   Oct-21-2012

     

    Big Data will Drive $28 Billion of IT Spending in 2012

    Big data will drive $28 billion of worldwide IT spending in 2012, according to Gartner, Inc. In 2013, big data is forecast to drive $34 billion of IT spending.

    Most of the current spending is used in adapting traditional solutions to the big data demands -- machine data, social data, widely varied data, unpredictable velocity, and so on -- and only $4.3 billion in software sales will be driven directly by demands for new big data functionality in 2012.

    Big data currently has the most significant impact in social network analysis and content analytics with 45 percent of new spending each year. In traditional IT supplier markets, application infrastructure and middleware is most affected (10 percent of new spending each year is influenced by big data in some way) when compared with storage software, database management system, data integration/quality, business intelligence or supply chain management (SCM).

    Big data opportunities emerged when several advances in different IT categories aligned in a short period at the end of the last decade, creating a dramatic increase in computing technology capacity. This new capacity, coupled with latent demands for analysis of "dark data," social networks data and operational technology (or machine data), created an environment highly conducive to rapid innovation.

    Starting near the end of 2015, Gartner expects leading organizations to begin to use their big data experience in an almost embedded form in their architectures and practices. Beginning in 2018, big data solutions will be offering increasingly less of a distinct advantage over traditional solutions that have incorporated new features and functions to support greater agility when addressing volume, variety and velocity. However, the skills, practices and tools currently viewed as big data solutions will persist as leading organizations will have incorporated the design principles and acquired the skills necessary to address big data concerns as routine flexibility.
    [Full Article]   Oct-21-2012

     

    Employers Share Most Unusual Excuses Employees Gave for Calling in Sick

    Playing hooky isn't just for Ferris Bueller. In the past year, 30 percent of workers have called in sick when not actually ill, keeping on par with previous years. Sick days, legitimate or otherwise, also become more frequent around the winter holidays, with nearly one-third of employers reporting more employees call in sick during the holiday season.

    The study was conducted online by Harris Interactive© from August 13 to September 6, 2012 and included 2,494 hiring managers and human resource professionals and 3,976 workers across industries and company sizes.

  • To Catch a Faker


  • Twenty-nine percent of employers have checked up on an employee to verify that the illness is legitimate, usually by requiring a doctor’s note or calling the employee later in the day. Some employers have had other employees call a suspected faker (18 percent) or even gone so far as to drive by the employee’s home (14 percent). Seventeen percent of employers have fired employees for giving a fake excuse.

  • Home for the Holidays


  • Thirty-one percent of employers notice an uptick in sick days around the winter holidays. This helps make December the most popular month to call in sick, with 20 percent saying their employees call in the most during that month. July is the next most popular month to skip out on work, followed by January and February.

  • At Least You Have Your Health


  • Not all sick days are spent under piles of blankets with a thermometer and maximum-strength medicine. Next to actually being sick, the most common reasons employees call in sick are because they just don’t feel like going to work (34 percent), or because they felt like they needed to relax (29 percent). Others take the day off so they can make it to a doctor’s appointment (22 percent), catch up on sleep (16 percent), or run some errands (15 percent).

  • Excuses, Excuses


  • Some workers come up with slightly more colorful explanations for their absences. When asked to share the most memorable excuses, employers reported the following real-life examples:

  • Employees sobriety tool wouldn't allow the car to start

  • Employee forgot he had been hired for the job

  • Employee said her dog was having a nervous breakdown

  • Employee's dead grandmother was being exhumed for a police investigation

  • Employee's toe was stuck in a faucet

  • Employee said a bird bit her

  • Employee was upset after watching “The Hunger Games”

  • Employee got sick from reading too much

  • Employee was suffering from a broken heart

  • Employee's hair turned orange from dying her hair at home

  • [Full Article]   Oct-14-2012

     

    Research Tackles Mounting Risks from Mobile Devices in the Enterprise

    RSA, The Security Division of EMC, released a new research report from the Security for Business Innovation Council (SBIC) that addresses the continued surge of consumer mobile devices in the enterprise and shares security leaders' insights on how to manage the fast-changing mobility risks while maximizing business opportunities.

    Mobile threats are developing quickly and technologies keep shifting creating new security holes. As more and more consumer devices access corporate networks and store corporate data, potentially devastating consequences range from the loss or leakage of valuable intellectual property to brand damage if fraudulent access results in a high-profile security breach. The Council consensus is that the time is now for enterprises to integrate risk management into their mobile vision. The potential benefits include increased agility, improved productivity, faster sales, and reduced costs. Capitalizing on the business opportunities of mobile computing is only possible if enterprises know the risks and how to manage them.

    In the report, the Council presents five strategies for building effective, adaptable mobile programs:

    Establish mobile governance – Organizations should engage cross-functional teams to set clear ground rules. Every mobile project should start by defining business goals, including expectations of cost savings or revenue generation, and by establishing the level of risk that the organization is willing to accept to achieve those goals.

    Create an action plan for the near-term – Mobile security technologies are fast-moving and, in many cases, too nascent to allow organizations to make long-term mobile security investments. The Council lays out several stop gap measures and key steps to take over the next 12-18 months.

    Build core competencies in mobile app security – Knowing how to design mobile apps in a way that protects corporate data is absolutely critical, yet many information security teams do not have the necessary level of expertise. The Council emphasizes it's not just about bolting on security, but requires a careful examination of the app's overall functionality and architecture, and they provide key design criteria.

    Integrate mobility into long-term vision – Numerous trends are affecting long-term risk management planning. Organizations need to update their approach to security including risk-based, adaptive authentication; network segmentation; data-centric security controls; and cloud-based gateways.

    Expand mobile situational awareness – Corporate security teams should deepen and continually refresh their understanding of the mobile ecosystem.
    [Full Article]   Oct-14-2012

     

    PwC Survey finds that Private Companies see Business Benefits in Formal Corporate Governance

    A large majority of private companies (80%) are adopting specific corporate governance practices to help them successfully navigate an increasingly complex and volatile business landscape, according to PwC US’s latest Private Company Trendsetter Barometer survey. Corporate governance at those companies takes the form of official policies promoting oversight and accountability in a variety of areas, including financial reporting, corporate strategy, and risk management. Nearly all (89%) of private companies that embrace corporate governance appear to do so voluntarily.

    Balancing Immediate Concerns with the Long View

    Although private companies do not face the short-term, quarterly-earnings pressure that their public counterparts confront, financial concerns remain pressing for many private businesses in today's still-challenging economy. A majority of Trendsetter companies are nonetheless applying corporate governance principles to long-term corporate strategy. An even greater percentage, however, are applying those principles to more-immediate issues, such as financial reporting and fiscal planning. Private companies are less focused on succession planning -- just one-third of them have a formal, documented succession plan.

    Main areas of corporate governance at private companies:

  • Financial reporting - 71%

  • Fiscal planning - 61%

  • Regulatory compliance - 61%

  • Long-term corporate strategy - 56%

  • Risk management - 54%

  • Corporate performance - 49%

  • Executive performance & compensation - 49%

  • Talent management/business succession - 43%

  • [Full Article]   Oct-07-2012

     

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