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Worldwide Customer Relationship Management Software Market Grew 12.5 Percent in 2012

Salesforce.com passed SAP as the lead vendor in the worldwide customer relationship management (CRM) software market in 2012, according to Gartner, Inc. Total worldwide CRM software revenue totaled $18 billion in 2012, up 12.5 percent from $16 billion in 2011.

Vendors benefited from strong demand for software as a service (SaaS), which represented nearly 40 percent of CRM total software revenue in 2012, as organizations of all sizes sought easier-to-deploy alternatives to replace legacy systems, as net-new applications or to provide alternative complementary functionality.

The top five CRM vendors accounted for nearly 50 percent of CRM software revenue in 2012. Salesforce.com replaced SAP as the largest vendor in the CRM market as its direct sales pushed its CRM revenue to more than $2.5 billion. Second-place SAP's growth was less than one percent in USD terms, largely because currency headwinds were stronger in 2012 and the euro was weak. While SAP was not the worldwide leader in CRM for 2012, it was still the largest vendor in terms of revenue in Western and Eastern Europe.

North America and Western Europe remained the largest regions for CRM, accounting for more than 80 percent of total software revenue, but all regions saw growth. Western Europe's growth was less than one percent, due in part to the strong dollar, which made overall comparisons with prior years difficult. Overall spending in the IT market in Western Europe has been muted because of economic reasons. Areas of growth continued to be in Eastern Europe, Eurasia, and the Middle East and Africa, which saw IT spending for the modernization of countries' infrastructure (utilities, telecommunications, banking and government).

In 2012, vendors continued to expand their offerings with new features and functionality, often through acquisition. The wave of consolidation activity that began flowing through the market in 2009 continued throughout 2012, with more than 50 acquisitions, resulting in increased competition at the top end of the market, with the real start of the global sales forces kicking in some sales. Marketing has been the focus for investment in the past couple of years, growing at more than four times the software industry forecast norm in 2012. Marketing was also the target area for acquisitions by IBM, Microsoft, Oracle and others as analytics, lead quality and multichannel support for social and mobile technologies continue to lead the list of requirements by line-of-business buyers.
[Full Article]   May-05-2013

 

U.S. Tech Market will Grow by 6.2% in 2013 and 6.8% in 2014

No one would claim that the US tech market is booming. With Europe still mired in recession and debt problems, US economic growth looking soft, and business and consumer worries about the US government raising tax rates and cutting Federal spending, it is not surprising that businesses and governments are being cautious in their purchases of technology goods and services. But we think the fear is overblown. Forrester's forecast for the US tech market in 2013 and 2014 -- published as "US Tech Market Outlook For 2013 And 2014: Better Times Ahead" -- projects a 6.2% rise in 2013 and a 6.8% growth in 2014 in US business and government purchases of computer equipment, communications equipment, software, IT consulting and systems integration services, and IT outsourcing. Adding in slow growing telecommunications services pulls growth down to 5.7% in 2013 and 6.1% in 2014. That may not be a boom, but it is certainly not a bust.

While CIOs are cautious in their tech buying -- and in the case of the Federal government, actually cutting back -- that caution has and will show up mostly in reduced spending on computer and communications equipment (with the exception of tablets). CIOs will be most aggressive in software, especially for SaaS apps, analytics, and mobile apps. IT outsourcing will see good growth in 2013 as the result of 2012 selection decisions, while IT consulting and systems integration will come on strong in 2014. Business and government purchases of telecommunications services will continue to grow at a slower rate than the overall tech market.

Construction, transportation, education, and healthcare will grow their IT budgets the fastest in 2013. CIOs in these industries will increase their IT spending due to better business conditions (construction, transportation) or market pressures (education and healthcare). CIOs in manufacturing will turn more cautious, and those in the federal government will have to reduce their tech buying in the face of mandated budget cutbacks.
[Full Article]   May-05-2013

 

Big Data, Analytics, and Cloud Drove Enterprise Software Growth in 2012

International Data Corporation (IDC) released the latest results from the Worldwide Semiannual Software Tracker. For 2012, the worldwide software market grew 3.6% year over year reaching a total market size of $342 billion, which was in line with IDC's previous forecast of 3.4% and less than half the growth rate experienced in 2010 and 2011. In that sense, 2012 confirms the beginning of a more conservative growth period. In the middle of this scenario, there are faster growing market segments, such as Data Access, Analysis and Delivery, Collaborative Applications, CRM Applications, Security Software, and System and Network Management Software. Every one of these markets grew in the 6-7% range, about double the rate for enterprise software as a whole.

Three primary segments comprise the total software market in IDC's software taxonomy: Applications; Application Development & Deployment (AD&D); and Systems Infrastructure Software. Among the three primary segments, the AD&D segment, which comprised nearly 24% of total software revenues in 2012, was the fastest growing market with a 4.6% year-over-year growth rate. Growth in the AD&D segment was largely driven by the performance of the Data Access, Analysis, and Delivery and the Structured Data Management secondary markets with 6.0% and 5.9% growth rates, respectively. Business Intelligence and Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS) solutions are pushing the growing trend for these markets because of widening Big Data and Analytics adoption. Big data and analytics are also closely tied to the fast growth social business software markets, where the combination of contextual data and the "right" expertise is becoming critical for supporting enterprise decision making and data driven customer experience solutions.

In the Applications primary market segment, which comprised 49% of total software revenue, year-over-year growth for 2012 was 3.3%, which is slightly lower than for software overall. Within this market segment, CRM and Collaborative Applications stood out with year-over-year growth rates near 7%. While the former is driven by the cloud migration trend and the large investments by businesses to deliver a better customer experience to the "social customer", the latter is largely driven by the Enterprise Social Software market, which grew at 24.8% year over year and gained more than 5 points of market share over three years. Mobile, while not a direct enterprise applications driver, is however a contributing factor and driver for businesses moving to newer and more mobile device agnostic enterprise software.

The third primary segment of the software market is System Infrastructure Software, which comprised 27% of total software revenue and grew 3.3% year over year in 2012. The Security Software and System/Network Management Software secondary segments both grew more than 6% year over year as these solutions provide the infrastructure - whether in the cloud or on-premise - to support the 3rd Platform. Although the other two System Infrastructure Software secondary segment (Storage Software and System Software) had flat growth in 2012, the Virtualization sub-segments had double-digit growth rates.
[Full Article]   Apr-28-2013

 

Millennial Workers Want Greater Flexibility, Work/Life Balance, Global Opportunities

The Millennial generation, those born between 1980 and 1995, seek more workplace flexibility, better balance between their work and home life, and opportunity for overseas assignments as keys to greater job satisfaction, according to the largest, most comprehensive study conducted into the attitudes and behaviors of Gen Y – a two-year undertaking initiated by PwC.

The research both confirmed and dispelled stereotypes about the Millennials who already make up about two-thirds of PwC's global workforce. While younger workers are more tech savvy, globally focused, and willing to share information, the study found they did not feel more entitled or less committed than their older, non-Millennial counterparts, and are willing to work just as hard. The global survey also found that many of the Millennials' attitudes are consistently shared by their more senior colleagues.

The study sought to measure factors relating to workplace retention, loyalty and job satisfaction. It compared responses among Millennials to those of non-Millennials at the same stage of their careers to assess generational differences between the two sets of employees.


Among the major findings of PwC's NextGen study:

  • Millennial employees want greater flexibility…and so does everyone else.


  • Millennials and non-Millennials alike want the option to shift their work hours to accommodate their own schedules and are interested in working outside the office where they can stay connected by way of technology. Employees across all generations also say they would be willing to forego some pay and delay promotions in exchange for reducing their hours.


  • Given the opportunity, 64% of Millennials (and 66% of non-Millennials) would like to occasionally work from home, and 66% of Millennials (and 64% of non-Millennials) would like the option to occasionally shift their work hours.


  • Across the board, 15% of all male employees and 21% of all female employees say they would give up some of their pay and slow the pace of promotion in exchange for working fewer hours.


  • Millennials put a premium on work/life balance. Unlike past generations, who put an emphasis on their careers and worked well beyond a 40-hour work week in the hope of rising to higher-paying positions later on, Millennials are not convinced that such early career sacrifices are worth the potential rewards. A balance between their personal and work lives is more important to them.


  • Other findings:

  • 71% of Millennials (vs. 63% of non-Millennials) say that their work demands significantly interfere with their personal lives.


  • Globally-focused. More than one third (37%) of Millennials would like the opportunity to go on a global assignment (vs. 28% of non-Millennials).


  • Transparent. Almost half (43%) of Millennials say they have discussed their pay with co-workers (vs. 24% of non-Millennials).


  • Not entitled. Millennials say they do not deserve special treatment and are equally as committed as non-Millennials.

  • [Full Article]   Apr-28-2013

     

    Email and Co-Workers Among the Biggest Distractions at Work

    Just how distracting are unnecessary emails and chatty coworkers in the workplace? A new survey from Jive Software, Inc. found nearly four out of every five workers (79 percent) in the U.S. spend time during their workday checking emails when that time could be used towards something more productive. And, more than one-third of workers (36 percent) say the people they work with are their biggest distraction on the job.

    Key findings from the survey include:

    Time Wasted by American Workers on Email When They Could Be Doing Something More Productive:

  • 79 percent say they waste time checking emails


  • 18 percent spend more than a quarter of their workday checking irrelevant emails.


  • On average, American workers employed full time, part-time or self-employed spend 16 percent of a workday checking irrelevant email.


  • The Biggest Distractions at Work:

  • 36 percent of employed Americans said coworkers are their biggest distraction at work.


  • 20 percent said email was their biggest distraction during the workday.


  • 19 percent said that meetings are the most distracting during the workday.


  • Finding Work/Life Balance:

  • Close to half (48 percent) of employed Americans report working when on vacation.


  • Almost one fifth (19 percent) of employed Americans are more overwhelmed by technology at work now compared to five years ago.

  • [Full Article]   Apr-21-2013

     

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