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Contributed Articles

CIOs Must Learn the Politics of No

Saying no--the right way--may be the most powerful skill a CIO can learn. A smart "no" can set boundaries and enhance your leadership position. A stupid "no" can diminish your authority and make enemies.
[Full Article]   Dec-01-2013

 

Creating the Agent of Tomorrow

The role of frontline staff is evolving – fast. In any given day, they may need to be a consultative problem-solver one minute and a market analyst the next. In the same interaction, they need to deploy psychology skills to understand and empathize with a customer’s responses, and project management skills to negotiate and then drive through a solution with the wider business. For the organizations they work for this is a massive challenge. How do you give your staff the skills and knowledge to respond effectively and maintain or enhance the customer experience, without compromising productivity or burdening the organization with massive cost?
[Full Article]   Dec-01-2013

 

How to Implement Workforce Management in the Contact Center

Agent scheduling is a fragile balancing act that affects the balance of profit and loss. Accurate forecasting is imperative for the success of any contact center. This article presents 9 tips for implanting workforce management in the contact center.
[Full Article]   Nov-17-2013

 

Tips to Help CIOs Manage Shadow IT

With the increase in cloud computing and BYOD in the workplace, it's become increasingly difficult for IT departments to keep track of and manage software and hardware -- and maintain a secure environment. So what can CIOs and other IT leaders do to identify and manage Shadow IT -- software and hardware not directly under the control of IT -- and mitigate the potential risks? CIO.com asked dozens of IT, mobile and cybersecurity professionals to find out. Here are their top six tips for managing Shadow IT in the enterprise.
[Full Article]   Nov-17-2013

 

Employees Driving You Nuts? It Might Be You, Not Them

As humans, we get fed up with the people working for us. We expect them to have the same drive and energy for our enterprise as we do, even though they don't own the business. And we may despair that we can't control them, “fix” them or at least mold them into something closer to what we want. Don't despair. Often, it is the owner, not the worker, who is the biggest problem, and a few personal changes can go a long way toward improving staff morale and engagement – and keep you from getting so frustrated by the people you manage. Consider the following four ideas.
[Full Article]   Nov-17-2013

 

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